The Dance of Life

 

Tiny Dancers: Bees and Butterflies

From the graceful movements of a monarch as it flies to the so-called “waggle dance” (a form of communication) among bees to indicate food sources, pollinators are some of the world’s best dancers. And the detailed choreographies they perform are essential to the biodiversity of the planet.

 

Why use dance to address this ecological issue?

This is all about pollination, and the process of pollination is a dance. In fact, it is the dance of life. As pollinators spin from flower to flower, their intricate movements and flight patterns resemble choreography. Likewise, dance imagery often draws inspiration from these creatures. From classical ballets to Native American traditional dances, butterflies appear throughout the spectrum of humankind’s dances. Furthermore, the focus of the project is to get audiences literally “moving for monarchs”—both dancing and digging their hands into the dirt in order to plant pollinator friendly (meaning nectar producing, rather than ornamental) flower gardens.

"In Flight," Vetter-Drusch jumps over an orange variety of milkweed and other prairie flowers that support monarchs and other pollinators. Photo by Jaime Schirmer for Moving for Monarchs
“In Flight,” Vetter-Drusch jumps over an orange variety of milkweed and other prairie flowers that support monarchs and other pollinators. Photo by Jaime Schirmer for Moving for Monarchs